Blog

The Value of Cultural Heritage Experiences in the Museum

“As museums have evolved, so have their exhibits. We’ve seen displays go from wax model recreations of Neanderthals, miniaturized versions of places, touch and play set ups to interactive digital panels, integrated multi-media, and even augmented reality (AR) and virtual reality (VR) set ups that enhance the exhibit experience. As the years have gone on, museums have strived to create dynamic and appealing exhibits that entice new visitors and bring repeat visitors back. While resources can be limiting in terms of how dynamic an exhibit can be, there are creative ways to achieve a compelling exhibit. Online exhibits can offer additional, supplemental content in the form of videos, interviews, additional objects and information. One way museums have delivered more vibrant and meaningful exhibits has been to include cultural heritage experiences (CHE).”

Read the full post at Lucidea’s Think Clearly Blog.

3D Digitization in the Museum – Part 2: LIDAR

“Last week we introduced the topic of 3D digitization in museums. The post investigated 3D digitization adoption and explored one of the two main methods: photogrammetry. This post will evaluate the second method—LIDAR scanning—and will conclude with recommendations for museums to consider when choosing a 3D digitization method.” Read the full post at Lucidea’s Think Clearly Blog.

 

Image courtesy of U.S. Army Corps. of Engineers, via Flickr’s Creative Commons (https://www.flickr.com/photos/usacehq/24844542920), and follows the Creative Commons Attribution License: https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0/. Image downloaded for use September 2018, and was not purposefully altered. 

3D Digitization in the Museum – Part 1: Photogrammetry

“With increased availability of affordable virtual reality (VR) and augmented reality (AR) technologies, it may seem like 3D digitization of environments, objects, and structures is fairly new. For museums, experimenting with 3D digitization began in the early 2000s and is now becoming commonplace within a museum’s digitization lab.” Read the full post at Lucidea’s Think Clearly Blog.

 

Image courtesy of U.S. Army Corps. of Engineers, via Flickr’s Creative Commons (https://www.flickr.com/photos/usacehq/24844542920), and follows the Creative Commons Attribution License: https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0/. Image downloaded for use September 2018, and was not purposefully altered. 

 

 

Who Owns Digital Culture? An Important Question Museums Must Consider

“The ability to digitize and publish collections online through a collections management system has helped reinvent how museums present their holdings. In the beginning, there was resistance to publishing digital images of collection objects online. This was due to a (now proven false) concern that people would no longer visit the museum if they could view collections online.” Read the full post at Lucidea’s Think Clearly Blog.

The End of Net Neutrality & The Museum Digital Visitor

“In the United States, the Federal Communications Commission (FCC) has officially ended net neutrality and internet service providers (ISPs) are no longer regulated in their provision of internet usage. The end of net neutrality has many profound implications, and when you consider what it might mean for museums and other cultural institutions, the repercussions can be catastrophic.” Read the full post at Lucidea’s Think Clearly Blog.